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Police: Reform Is Down, Crime Is Working

Written by RSS Poster RetiredAndAngry

Well, honestly, it makes much more sense than the Crime Is Down, Reform Is Working mantra that we’re used to getting rammed down our throats doesn’t it?

On the matter of “REFORM” my view is clear, I’ve said it before and I’m sure I’ll have to say it again, but ‘Reform’ is simply NOT working, and it is not working on so many levels.

The Oxford Dictionary defines Reform:-

Make changes in (something, especially an institution or practice) in order to improve it.

Please tell me in which areas the Police Service has been improved because I’m struggling to think of one this morning.  Which other Public Service has been improved by Tory Reforms?  Again I’m struggling.  NHS, Fire & Rescue Service, Coastguard, Education, Justice have all been hugely improved by the Tories since 2010.  Armed Forces?  Don’t get me going on that one, suffice to say I don’t believe that successive governments have invested sufficiently in the Armed Forces.

There are some things in life that the government (of any...

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Police: SENTENCING GAP BETWEEN MALE AND FEMALE

Written by RSS Poster The Justice of the Peace
My criticism of police and their more than occasional thin skins does not allow failure of a bench of magistrates to offer them public protection to go unnoticed.  The offender in this case has such a history of violent behaviour towards them that the words of the bench chairman do not stand up to scrutiny however truncated the report....in my humble opinion of course.   She was at the earlier stage of a community sentence and had had a previous opportunity to solve her alcohol problem.  

This seems to be a perfect example of offering a woman a sentencing option which would not be offered to a male offender.


Police: Restriction, Restraint or Removal?

Written by RSS Poster Mental Health Cop

I recently delivered some training in Leicestershire which involved explaining the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to emergency services personnel. Quite unintendedly, I ended up explaining it in a way I previously hadn’t which struck me as a more helpful approach than my previous efforts! So, I thought I’d outline it here in case it helps others.

As quick reminder, the MCA allows others to take decisions about a person who is reasonably believed, on the balance of probabilities to lack capacity. A person lacks capacity about a specific issue if they have an impairment or disturbance of the mind or brain and cannot communicate, understand, retain or employ / evaluate information relevant to that decision. For those who like mnemonics, you may remember the “ID a CURE” approach –

  • Impairment; or
  • Distrubance
  • and cannot …
  • Communicate,
  • Understand,
  • Retain; or
  • Employ / Evaluate

One from the top two and one from the bottom four and, on the balance of probabilities, you can declare a lack of capacity.  But what does...

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Police: POLICE WANT SECRECY ON MISCONDUCT

Written by RSS Poster The Justice of the Peace
Giving some thought to today`s post it occurred to me that quite a high proportion of my posts have been devoted to criticism of police.  A few years ago that criticism was generally directed against the policies of constabularies or the unusual procedures undertaken by them.  But more recent postings have been more concerned with the antics of senior police officers and the ineptitude or worse that has passed for activities more befitting those cops from Keystone were they not much more serious. The most recent such comments were posted here on August 19th.

The Chief Officers` Council; formally ACPO, in its collective wisdom has tried to persuade its overseers that cases of alleged misconduct against its members be kept secret. What arrogance!  From Watergate to Whitehall it has been demonstrated that the cover up when revealed (as it usually is eventually) has greater ramifications that the misdeed itself.  Those whom we pay and entrust to lead the enforcement of the law should  be the most open of all to scrutiny when that trust appears, rightly or wrongly, to have been misplaced.


Police: When I was a PC

Written by RSS Poster policecommander

 

When I started out as a PC in the early 1990s, things were a little different to the way they are now.

I handwrote my first crime reports on large sheets of colour-coded paper and filed them in binders in the CID office.

I prepared my warrant applications on an antique typewriter – one of those dusty old machines with raised keys and a carriage return lever.

I had a pair of chain link handcuffs.

There were fewer specialists and more officers on response teams.

There was less driving and more walking. I learned my beats and discovered where the best tea holes were.

There was a lot more overtime – with many more people willing and available to work it. In fact, it was names in the hat pretty much every time.

There was less bureaucracy and, outside of the Control Room, not a computer in sight.

Cybercrime was just a made up word.

I wasn’t faced with a succession of performance targets that made little sense – and almost no difference to the lives of those we served. I was simply expected to work hard.

Whilst the IRA was still...

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Police: THE VIRTUAL WORLD OF POLICING

Written by RSS Poster The Justice of the Peace
I have no idea of how many "press" officers are employed by the nation`s police forces but I reckon they all work overtime.  I can`t think of any other public service except perhaps the MOJ where journalistic spin seems to be as much part of its daily environment as the reality of its activities. Two sets of announcements recently have emphasised this variance.  On August 16th a little read publication  "Insurance Times" had a report on the wonderful initiative of City of London Police  to combat cyber crime.  Oh how fortunate we are to have such  stout fellows working behind the scenes to protect are wallets and purses.  But and it`s a big "but" today it has been revealed that 4.5 million debit and/or credit cards have been cancelled owing to fraud by those very same cyber criminals being sought by City of London Police.  It is becoming increasingly difficult to take seriously any statements from any senior police officers in any police force in the country. West Midlands is a classic example.  Last week they
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Police: Police Liaison

Written by RSS Poster Mental Health Cop

I woke upon one day last week and whilst boiling the kettle checked Twitter to find an article entitled ‘police liaison’ in the British Journal of Psychiatry (no less) about street triage.  Consumed with interest, I opened the PDF to find it granted free-access (I don’t subscribe) and I started reading.  In paragraph one, I admit to putting the phone down on the kitchen surface and breathing deeply whilst I got the milk out of the fridge. I read on, caffeinated!

The article sets an evaluation of street triage against the background of section 136 usage – more on that premise, later – and tells us that “it requires [my emphasis] the input of an Approved Mental Health Profession (AMHP) and two doctors for the assessment.”  Except that it doesn’t! …. it requires just one registered medical practitioner, which is made clear by subsection 2 of the section itself, which states, “A person removed to a place of safety under this section may be detained there for a period not exceeding 72 hours for the purpose of...

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Police: Police Liaison

Written by RSS Poster Mental Health Cop

I woke upon one day last week and whilst boiling the kettle checked Twitter to find an article entitled ‘police liaison’ in the British Journal of Psychiatry (no less) about street triage.  Consumed with interest, I opened the PDF to find it granted free-access (I don’t subscribe) and I started reading.  In paragraph one, I admit to putting the phone down on the kitchen surface and breathing deeply whilst I got the milk out of the fridge. I read on, caffeinated!

The article sets an evaluation of street triage against the background of section 136 usage – more on that premise, later – and tells us that “it requires [my emphasis] the input of an Approved Mental Health Profession (AMHP) and two doctors for the assessment.”  Except that it doesn’t! …. it requires just one registered medical practitioner, which is made clear by subsection 2 of the section itself, which states, “A person removed to a place of safety under this section may be detained there for a period not exceeding 72 hours for the purpose of...

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Police: To Double-Crew Or Not To Double-Crew?

Written by RSS Poster RetiredAndAngry

That is, indeed, the question. 

To me the answer is an unequivocal YES.  In my mind there is no option, it doesn’t need thinking about, it’s a No Brainer.

But then, my mind doesn’t always sync with everybody else’s.

It occurs to me that it’s nearly half a century since my boots hit the streets of North West London for the very first time and things were most definitely very different in those days.  We had Reliefs, at first 3,  later 4 and for a crazy while 5 (but that didn’t really work). Each Relief comprised one Inspector, probably 3 Sergeants, maybe 4, and about 20ish Constables. The Division covered maybe 10-12 square miles, and in an ideal world we would aim to field one Area Car (double-crewed possibly with a 3rd officer as ‘Observer’), one Van (normally double-crewed), five Pandas (notionally single-crewed but often seen double-crewed), one unmarked General Purpose car (single-crewed), one Section Sergeant and one Inspector, all patrolling.  Anybody left over was posted to a Foot...

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Police: DISQUALIFY MOBILE PHONE DRIVERS

Written by RSS Poster The Justice of the Peace
Just over three years ago I posted that increased fines for using a mobile phone whilst driving would be ineffective in controlling this dangerous occupation.  Increasing the number of penalty points was I opined the only sensible deterrent. The problem is getting worse. In its latest report the RAC Foundation states that in road accidents in Great Britain 240 people were killed where one driver was over the drink/drive limit. In the RAC Report on Motoring published today it is stated that "a significant minority of motorists (31%) admit to having used a handheld phone to make or receive calls while driving at some point in the past 12 months".  Government figures indicate that between 2012 and 2014  67 people were killed on our roads because a driver was using a mobile phone. The penalties for alcohol related driving offences are well known; disqualification on first offence for twelve months. Through that deterrence and social changes drink driving and its terrible consequences has been reduced. By...

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PC Bloggs - a Twenty-first Century Police Officer (116)
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